Survival Tips for Living On Campus!

Keith Peters

Students who are given the privilege of semi-independence when living on campus can either embrace the challenge with positive prospects or with a great sense of worry. For some, the transition can be a world of convenience as they embrace college life, while for others it may seem like they are being sent to a confined institution and walled-in for training until they are ready to face the real world. One thing is for sure though when about to live on campus — a great adventure you will never forget is approaching!

Instead of worrying too much about uncertainties, what’s more important is to focus on the various opportunities that will present themselves once you are a resident of the hall. Of course like in any other fresh undertaking, challenges will arise if you are unprepared. It’s also important to note that you’ll be living with other people from now on and must develop the regard for others now more than ever.

Consider your housing options.

Before you go and take out your travel bags, consider your options first if you are to live on campus. For some universities and colleges, there are dorm rooms you can live within school premises which makes things more ideal and convenient for you, particularly in running to and from classes. Other schools don’t have dormitories though but there are usually some bed spaces and apartments you can rent out for more privacy.

Take the time to conduct ocular inspections of your housing options and weigh the pros and cons in terms of cost, convenience, and opportunities. In-house dormitories get you closer to school communities which you can join in but will let you stay with a roommate, while off-school spaces can give you more independence but may require a long daily walk to attend your classes and a bigger budget.

Most house owners that rent out a room for students also impose strict curfew schedules so make sure that you follow every house rule because after all, these off-school spaces won’t guarantee your safety unlike the dorms within school grounds which is much safer.

Be mindful of space.

Let’s say you rent out space with a roommate and space is just the right size. It’s not too cramped and not too spacious either. Since you’ll be living with your roommate for a good amount of time, it’s best that you be considerate of what things you’ll be hauling in that will take up space in your room. Don’t bring along your entire wardrobe or 10ft. x 10ft. computer table if you don’t want your roommate looking daggers at you while you sleep. And even if it’s roomy enough, make sure that you have an equal share of the space to avoid unnecessary drama. Being considerate in all aspects of living on campus is the first thing you have to learn if you want to enjoy the experience.

Learn to mingle.

As you learn to live away from home and into the arms of a sea of people, another important thing you should learn to develop is patience. Not everyone you’ll meet will be willing to help you or be your friend and that’s just one of life’s harsh realities. However, this is the best time for you to learn how to take the high road when trivial things such as bothersome roommates, unfair circumstances, and even friends seeking personal advice occur.

Hone your communication skills and talk things out when there’s something bothering you. Always keeping to yourself is a definite ‘no-no’ while you live within the campus and you’ll definitely need to engage yourself in community activities if you want to survive the challenges of college life.

Familiarize early.

Once you have picked out a space to rent out for college, acquaint yourself with the surroundings immediately. When the first day of school comes, you should know where the nearest photocopy shop is, the nearest library you can study in, or the nearest cafe you can grab a bite from. The best trick to this is having the foresight and being early in all things you have to do prior to the start of school. This way, you can plan your daily routines and make life easier as the school year passes. While you’re at it, ask about road conditions during the rainy season, alternate routes to school, and nearby places to avoid due to high crime rates if any. Being ready is always a good thing especially if you’re new to your surroundings.

As you break into the threshold of semi-independence, bear in mind that you still need to be looked after. Living away from home and into the vicinity of the campus is not as intense and far from being similar to the real world of adults. Be keen on listening to your parents’ and teachers’ advice. Lastly, don’t be way too eager to spend more time outdoors than in because you might compromise your safety and ruin a great experience just because of one care-free mistake.

For students who are looking to transition to the dorm life but are low on budget, the country’s leading education loan provider InvestEd offers financial assistance for dormitory fees. Click here to learn more about the program!